ATLAS OF<DIGITALIZATION>

ATLAS OF<DIGITALIZATION>

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Utilizing IoT to help buildings get smart


We all know the advantages that technology offers. We are online 24/7. We live in interconnectivity kingdom. However, one of the greatest challenges facing cities is technological integration into city’s infrastructures. How can we take advantage of IoT to create more intelligent and autonomous infrastructures?

If we want to stay relevant and up to date, not betting on incorporating technology into our buildings is a mistake. Why? It’s a question of numbers. We are the indoor generation: much of our existence develops within four walls. It is therefore necessary to create areas in which people can work, heal, learn or rest as successfully as possible. This can mean greater efficiency, but also more pleasant living together and lower costs.

Already today, the information that buildings can generate is enormous. Digital technology allows disparate buildings to work together, sharing that data and optimizing their performance.

A smart building enables:

  • Integration of automation, fire detection, security, lighting and shading systems
  • Reduced costs of products, installation and construction times
  • Optimization of maintenance work
  • Enhanced energy management and use of space
  • Higher inhabitant/user satisfaction rates

It is important to implement ongoing maintenance programs that translate data into actionable information through centralized analytics and reporting.

How to make buildings smart?

To start, it’s important to implement ongoing maintenance programs that translate data into actionable information through centralized analytics and reporting. This will be the starting point for the system to be managed with new maintenance approaches and adapted to future needs. To get there, start with thorough planning, and create a Technology Roadmap that will set the basis of objectives and goals for the building itself, as well as the means to achieve them, with a perspective for the next 20 years. Each plan must have its own genuine structure in order to know which systems match the needs.

A complete portfolio of smart building technologies already exists. At Siemens, we put an emphasis on three areas in particular:

  • An intelligent infrastructure that allows the collection and analysis of building data. The data is based on the state of the building, its occupants and the environment.
  • Digital services are ready to reach new levels of performance thanks to the continuous flow of information and knowledge about facility conditions and operations, all available in the cloud.
  • A range of IoT solutions, including digital applications facilitating power management, space utilization, safe and secure environments, location-based services and customized work experience. All of these enhance the occupants’ experience and drives revenue growth.

What does a bulding need to be smart?

We are spending so much time indoors, maintaining good indoor air quality is a matter of necessity. The World Health Organization (WHO) details the negative health effects of indoor air pollution, which is just as important as the air we find outside our homes. The essentials for improved indoor air quality are air quality monitors, a good ventilation of spaces, and to pay attention to so-called “Sick Buildings”. High concentrations of CO2 directly affect the health of people; the loaded air not only means being in an environment with a rapid spread of diseases, but can produce symptoms such as fatigue, heaviness, headaches and consequently a low performance in our tasks.

To optimize the life cycle of a building, from its construction to its renovation or demolition, a system capable of linking the information generated during the entire construction phase is required. Building Information Modeling (BIM) software carries out this work using Smart Data and predicting what the future behaviors will be. This anticipation is done through a digital twin of the building that includes all the data of the project. By virtue of this it is possible to determine how the behavior will be and adapt the planning to such demands.

Other comfort and accessibility related solutions include:

  • Personalization systems for rooms. Through them, values such as temperature or luminosity can be adjusted, creating individualized experiences.
  • Intelligent parking with tools that facilitate actions such as collection, reservation of spaces or the location of vacant areas.
  • Predictive maintenance in order to improve management systems. These systems can be programmed to detect alterations and immediately send a warning of the error. In consequence reaction times are reduced.

We will highlight all of this, and much more, at Smart City Expo 2019. An unmissable event in which experts from different countries discuss how to make cities smarter and more sustainable. Join us there!

BY elisa ronka

Elisa leads the go-to-market of human-centric workplace solutions for Siemens Smart Infrastructure in Europe. With a background in finance, design thinking and development, she supports the transformation of the building industry to a digitally enabled and experience-focused one.

@elisa_ronka

TOPICS

IoT / smart building / smart city expo / smart infrastructure

We’d love to hear from you

Siemens are at the forefront of everything Smart Cities. To learn more or make a suggestion please get in touch.

GET IN TOUCH

Explore the cities

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